A BIT OF WORD GENIUS

WORD OF THE DAY
Perspicacious
pur-spə-kā-shuhs
Part of speech: adjective
Origin: Latin, 17th century
1

Highly perceptive, keen

2

Discerning, shrewd

Examples of Perspicacious in a sentence

“The perspicacious 9-year-old easily picked up on my feelings without me even saying anything.”

“I take a perspicacious approach to my studies, analyzing every word in my textbooks.”

 

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MEMORY RECALL
Our club wanted to communicate in secret, so we developed a ______ that only we understood.
Foible
Motte
Bombinate
Conlang
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Brusque
brəsk
Part of speech: adjective
Origin: French & Italian, 16th century
1

Very abrupt or curt

2

Rudely blunt

Examples of Brusque in a sentence

“Her short, brusque reply said more than any wordy explanation could.”

“Rather than being brusque with customers, I try to listen and respond politely

 

WORD OF THE DAY
Deracinate
dē-rasə-nāt
Part of speech: verb
Origin: French, 16th century
1

To uproot

2

To take something out of its native environment

Examples of Deracinate in a sentence

“My family deracinated from our home country to search for a better life elsewhere.”

“After I deracinated all the weeds, my garden looked better than ever.”

 

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MEMORY RECALL
Much to my ________, the birthday party was cancelled and I didn’t get to enjoy any cake.
Gibbous
Asperity
Chagrin
Putsch
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MEMORY RECALL
She surrounded herself with a ______ of like-minded thinkers.
Coterie
Sobriquet
Hokum
Hamartia
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WORD OF THE DAY
Assiduous
ə-ˈsij-wəs
Part of speech: adjective
Origin: Latin, mid 16th century
1

Showing exceptional effort and perseverance

2

Meticulous and diligent

3

Constant or incessant

Examples of Assiduous in a sentence

“Her assiduous attention to detail in her work helped her land the big promotion.”

“He is an assiduous housecleaner—he doesn’t leave a single surface untouched.

 

WORD OF THE DAY
Degust
diˈɡəst
Part of speech: verb
Origin: Latin, early 17th century
1

To carefully and thoughtfully savor food

2

To taste in small portions

Examples of Degust in a sentence

“The experienced food critic would degust each dish with a discerning palate.”

“I prefer to degust every ingredient, and you can’t do that if you inhale the food as soon as it’s set in front of you.”

WORD OF THE DAY
Tintinnabulation
tin-tə-ˌna-byə-ˈlā-shən
Part of speech: noun
Origin: Latin, mid 19th century
1

The ringing of bells

2

A tinkling sound, like that of a bell

Examples of Tintinnabulation in a sentence

“I always look forward to the joyous tintinnabulation at church during the Christmas season.”

“The faint tintinnabulation in my ears is starting to drive me crazy.”

 

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MEMORY RECALL
I saw the man ______ into the room, despite the “Do Not Disturb” sign hanging from the doorknob.
Irrupt
Hornswoggle
Transfigure
Repose
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WORD OF THE DAY
Handsel
han(t)-səl
Part of speech: noun
Origin: Old English or Old Norse
1

A gift given for good luck

2

An initial payment

Examples of Handsel in a sentence

“My new business partner gave me a thoughtful handsel — she framed the first dollar we’d made — on our first week working together.”

“We had to pay a handsel before the landlord would reserve the apartment for us.”

 

MEMORY RECALL
The political candidate was quick to _______ his opponents during the debate.
Lollygag
Lambaste
Scintillate
Egress
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MEMORY RECALL
The movie star arrived at the premiere dressed in a perfectly fitted ___ suit.
Esoteric
Aquiver
Ineffable
Bespoke
WORD OF THE DAY
Mondegreen
män-də-ˌgrēn
Part of speech: noun
Origin: English, 1950s
1

A word or phrase that results from misheard language

2

A made-up lyric or line that replaces a song’s real words

Examples of Mondegreen in a sentence

“Singing along with Hendrix, she belted out the mondegreen “Excuse me while I kiss this guy.””

“He raps so quickly that his fans know only mondegreens rather than the true words of his songs.”

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MEMORY RECALL
You’d never guess by his thin body, but he has a ______ appetite.
Listless
Facultative
Quixotic
Voracious
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WORD OF THE DAY
Deciduous
di-ˈsi-jə-wəs
Part of speech: adjective
Origin: Latin, 17th century
1

In botany, shedding leaves annually or at a certain point in the growth cycle

2

Transitory or ephemeral

Examples of Deciduous in a sentence

“Come winter, the beautiful deciduous forest becomes barren and dull, and we wait for regrowth in the spring.”

“I didn’t realize the trees in my yard were deciduous, and every fall I have to rake fallen leaves on a daily basis.”

ORD OF THE DAY
Boffo
bä-(ˌ)fō
Part of speech: adjective
Origin: American English, 20th century
1

Wildly successful or popular

2

Outstanding

Examples of Boffo in a sentence

“The actress delivered such a boffo performance that she won an Academy Award.”

“The play had a boffo final act, resulting in a standing ovation from the audience.”

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WORD OF THE DAY
Nascent
na-sᵊnt
Part of speech: adjective
Origin: Latin, early 17th century
1

New and untested

2

Emerging or budding

Examples of Nascent in a sentence

“My nascent basketball skills have a lot of room for improvement.”

“The nascent product hadn’t yet been tested, but everyone at the company had high hopes for its future impact.”

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MEMORY RECALL
The members of the secret society would _____ together whenever outsiders walked by.
Fluke
Rigging
Cloister
Regale
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MEMORY RECALL
She was a true ______, always in need of rescue or explanation.
Ingenue
Asperity
Valetudinarian
Popinjay
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WORD OF THE DAY
Schadenfreude
shä-dᵊn-ˌfrȯi-də
Part of speech: noun
Origin: German
1

Pleasure taken from the misfortune of others

2

A desire to see others suffer

Examples of Schadenfreude in a sentence

“I experienced schadenfreude after hearing that my horrible manager had been fired.”

“Sarah couldn’t help but feel a bit of schadenfreude when she discovered that the man who’d stolen her car was now in prison.”

MEMORY RECALL
The bull became _____ when the matador raised his red cape.
Bellicose
Bespoke
Sanguine
Frivolous
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WORD OF THE DAY
Apoplectic
a-pə-ˈplek-tik
Part of speech: adjective
Origin: Late Latin, 17th century
1

Enraged to the point of fury

2

Relating to the causes of or denoting a stroke (apoplexy)

3

Likely to cause a stroke

Examples of Apoplectic in a sentence

“Dave was apoplectic when he realized I’d been stealing his lunches for the last two years.”

“I was worried when I discovered that my new patient was prone to becoming apoplectic.”

 

WORD OF THE DAY
Scintillate
sin-tə-ˌlāt
Part of speech: verb
Origin: Latin, early 17th century
1

To produce sparks or to sparkle

2

To draw attention with liveliness or beauty

Examples of Scintillate in a sentence

“Fireworks are designed to scintillate and entertain.”

“Her vibrant personality will scintillate everyone who interviews her.”

WORD OF THE DAY
Natation
nā-ˈtā-shən
Part of speech: noun
Origin: Latin, 16th century
1

Swimming

2

The action of floating

Examples of Natation in a sentence

“The flawless form of her natation made her a natural on the swim team.”

“The unique natation pattern of the flounder has made it a favorite of marine biologists.”

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WORD OF THE DAY
Alacrity
ə-ˈla-krə-tē
Part of speech: noun
Origin: Latin
1

A prompt response

2

A cheerful willingness

Examples of Alacrity in a sentence

“He may not be the most talented member of our team, but his alacrity makes him very easy to work with.”

“The alacrity with which the class responded to the exam was suspicious given their usual sense of despair.”

 

 

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